Monday, March 14, 2011

3.14159.... Chocolate Chess Pie

I gave into temptation.  I knew it was Pi Day.  But unlike National Chocolate Cake Day, I told myself I would not succumb to the temptation of needing to bake a pie like I did a chocolate cake. That worked fine until 2PM. A Chocolate Chess Pie came through my newsfeed on Facebook.

Chess Pie, what's that? I didn't know and I did not care. I saw a picture. I had the ingredients. That settled it. I got to work.



Chocolate Chess Pie
(Recipe source: Apartment Therapy)
((Printable Version))

Ingredients:

Chocolate Gram Crust-
10-11 sheets gram crackers  (I prefer the "original", not the honey.)
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon dark cocoa powder


Filling-
1 stick unsalted butter
1 (1 ounce) square unsweetened chocolate (or 3 tablespoons cocoa)
1 cup sugar
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt


Directions:
1. For the crust: Pulse the graham crackers in a food processor until finely ground.  Add the sugar and cocoa powder.  Give it another pulse.  Add the butter and combine until mixed. Press into a pie plate with the back of a spoon.

2. Chill for 20 minutes.  Bake in a preheated 325 degree F. oven for 15-20 minutes.  Cool for 20 minutes.

3. For the filling: Melt the butter and chocolate together.  Pour into a bowl and whisk together the sugar, eggs, vanilla and salt.  When the crust has cooled for 20 minutes, poor the filling into the crust and bake in a 325 degrees F. oven for about 40 minutes, until the top is set.

4. Top with whip cream or a dusting of powdered sugar.  (optional)

So, the verdict is.....


I still don't know what "chess" pie is or how it got it's name, but I don't care, it is to die for.

Linked to: Mangia Mondays, Sweets for a Saturday, Weekend Potluck

49 comments:

  1. That looks so delicious. I haven't had one in ages.

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  2. lovely.. cookies+chocolate + more chocolate = perfect pie :D

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  3. That's it?! How easy is that! Sounds really delicious. No wonder you snuck a piece this morning, oops

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  4. Oh boy, just try and hold me back from your pie.

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  5. Delish!! Printing this baby out right now and will be making it soon. Thanks so much for sharing!

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  6. seriously!? i don't care what chess pie is, either... i just want to DIG IN! the only downside i can see in making this, is that i would eat the entire thing!

    thanks for linking up to mangia mondays!

    -kristin

    http://delightfullydowling.blogspot.com

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  7. Anything double chocolate is good in my book :)

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  8. Chess pie is one of my all time favorite pies, it usually calls for corn meal so the top of the pie has a nice crunch, it always reminds me of home. This one looks amazing, thanks for sharing. I am in the process of tryin your chocolate chip cookie pie I'm sure it to will be "to die for". :-)

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  9. OH MY GOODNESS THIS LOOKS SOOOO GOOOOOD

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  10. Chocolate chess is amazing. Lemon chess is also delish. It's super easy and definitely makes an easy summer desert.

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    Replies
    1. Lemon Chess? For real? Do you have a recipe you've used and love? That sounds amazing!

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    2. Without having any of my grandmother's cookbooks at hand, I can recommend the old-timey (circa 1877) recipe from Buckeye Cookery, which is about as simple as you can get; or the recipe from Mrs. Rowe's Little Book of Southern Pies, courtesy of Leite's Culinaria, which includes the cornmeal that defines chess pie from transparent pie imo.

      Your chocolate chess sounds like just the thing for Sunday dessert after church.

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  11. Love the recipe! I have a different kind of Chess Pie every year for my birthday. Usually it is lemon but there are about 50 different kinds. My nana made them for me since I was about 3 years old. It's something made in the south during the depression I think. Chocolate is one of my favorites! This year, for the first time I didn't get one. My daughter took over making it after my nana passes away. But this year she is pregnant and couldn't stand the smell of ANYTHING. I'm making this for my birthday.....late......5 months late. Thanks for the great recipe!!

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  12. Chess pie is one of my favorites. We always had chess pie at Thanksgiving and Christmas when I was growing up. I still make it sometmes, and sometimes make the Lemon Chess variety. This year I made a Tangerine Chess pie ... yum! Whatever flavor is added, you just can't go wrong with butter and sugar in a crust!

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  13. My mother in law used to make Chess Pie and my son loves it. Can't wait to try this.

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  14. Do you store it in the fridge when it's done?

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    Replies
    1. I can't remember the last time I had leftovers of it. ;) If you aren't going to be eating it in a day or so, yes, I would keep it in the fridge after slicing it. Bring it back up to room temperature before serving. If you are baking it the day ahead- it should be fine being left at room temperature until you serve it.

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  15. This looks amazing! In Texas, Chess Pie is another name for Buttermilk Pie.

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  16. Chocolate chess pie is my favorite pie of all time. ever. although I do love a good chocolate pie (w/ meringue). There are a few sources that claim to give Chess pie its name. Because (decades ago) it was kept in a pie chest, hence the name "chess" pie.

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  17. I make an awesome coconut chess pie. I can't take it anywhere without people licking the pie plate it's that good.

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    Replies
    1. Do you have a link to that recipe? I love chess pies, I was recently introduced to them by a dear southern friend.

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  18. I just made minis of this last night! So yummy!

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  19. I made this in Australia and substituted Gram crackers for Butternut Snap biscuits for the base. Yummo!!!

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  20. Can salted butter be used instead of unsalted? What is the difference??

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    Replies
    1. Unsalted butter is generally used in baking. Salted butter can vary in saltiness which can be hard to control how salty your baked item ends up being. Salted butter is fine to use, you may just want to cut back on the salt in the recipe by a little bit.

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  21. I haven't paid close attention to the comments to see, but the story I have heard about the name 'chess' pie is that the lady who came up with the pie didn't have a name for it and when asked, she said in a southern accent, "it's jess pie" (it's just pie). That was then carried over as 'chess' pie. Don't know how true the story is, but cute all the same. I am working on making this right now for a cookout. I can't wait to try it. Thanks for posting!

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    Replies
    1. Leslie,
      I have not heard that story, but I love it! Thanks for sharing. :)

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  22. I make a choc chess pie....but I must say, that's the prettiest pic I ever did see!!!!!

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  23. This looks devine! What do you mean by "sheets"? Do you mean the full rectangular graham cracker?

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    1. A sheet would be all 4 rectangles together to form one big rectangle or "sheet".

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    2. Thanks!
      I wonder if this could be made GF using GF flour or maybe an almond crust.
      I can't wait to try your beautiful cake!!

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    3. I don't have much experience with gluten free, but I did try a crust once for a friend that I made out of crushed rice krispies and melted butter. It turned out pretty good.

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    4. Awesome! Thanks for the tip.

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    5. There are GF graham crackers out there, my mom uses them for my Dad, who has celiac.

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  24. LOVED this!!! So yummy and crazy easy to make. I am making it for the second time right now

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    Replies
    1. That's wonderful! Thank you so much. :)

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  25. a chess pie is traditionally a pie made from eggs, sugar, butter and little flour. Some recipes include corn meal and/or vinegar. http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/PieHistory/ChessPie.htm

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  26. I am about to make this and have graham cracker crumbs in a box...how much do you think...1.5 cups? 2 cups?

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  27. I made this today and it was delicious, but it wasn't set up firm on the inside like the picture showed it was partially firm and some liquid. Should I have may be cooked it longer or let it rest a little longer?

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    Replies
    1. The outside is crusty and the inside is almost like an underdone brownie or a flourless chocolate cake... creamy but not liquidy.

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  28. I made this yesterday and the crust burned a little. I think crust should only cook for about 10-12 minutes and the pie for less as well. It tasted delish though!

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  29. This is an "OUTTA-DA-PARK HOME RUN!" Kudos, & Booyah... I have made this pie twice in 2 weeks and I still can't get enough. I almost ate the entire pie myself in one sitting. (Need Jedi Mind Control) lol Thanks for the Recipe !

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    1. Ha! Let me know if the Jedi Mind Control works for you. I need some of that. ;) Glad you liked the pie!

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  30. hess pies are uniquely southern. Why are they called “chess” pies? Well, one explanation suggests that the word was originally “chest,” but when pronounced with a drawl, became “chess” and was used to describe these pies that could be stored in a pie chest rather than an icebox because their sweetness naturally preserved them. Its texture is somewhere between a custard and a cheesecake.

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  31. This recipe was so good. But I used salted butter and no kosher salt.

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    Replies
    1. I also just bought a chocolate gram cracker crust instead of baking one.

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